What’s in an Age? [Guest post from Dr. Alice Gooding, Kennesaw State University]

Are we really doomed to mechanical and material breakdowns in our skeletons shortly after we reach adulthood? It is true that bone loss with age in humans is nearly universal. It has been documented worldwide in both living and past populations, as well as non-human primates. And though bone loss may begin after bones fuse, it accelerates during mid-life (after age 40) and continues after mid-life in humans. Increased bone loss is concurrent with an increased risk of fracture, decreased mobility, and even in industrialized societies, increased mortality. Why do humans live long past the years when bone loss begins?

Read More

Making Medical Practitioners Biologists and Not Mechanics: Lessons from ISEMPH 2017

A long-standing concern of the International Society for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health and its membership is that more than cursory education in the most basic evolutionary theory, or how scientific inquiry is conducted, is lacking from many medical curricula. This is alarming when we consider that medicine is a form of applied biology. As evolutionary theory is the principal principle that unites all biology (much as physics underlies all engineering), learning a form of applied biology should logically begin with an education in evolution. Furthermore, scientific literacy, and the ability to tell well-executed science from poorly executed research, is essential when evaluating a burgeoning literature ranging from experimental therapies to evolving pathogens.

Read More

Conversations About Evolution and Pokémon

Having spent two summers teaching natural science at Governor’s School West in North Carolina, I’ve absorbed some valuable lessons. These lessons include how to interact with students from a wide cross-section of backgrounds who are united by an interest in science, how to collaborate with instructors who have diverse experiences and herald from various disciplines, and how to spark curiosity in students who mostly have not considered where their interests and passions will lie. To be honest, I’d never even considered teaching high schoolers before I started working at the Governor’s School. As it turns out, there’s a lot of good that comes from teaching evolution to a bunch of budding scientists.

Read More